Monthly Archives: January 2014

Heinz Kueppenbender (1901 -89)

Published in Spring 2000  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Page 11.

A biogrpahy of the first head of Zeiss Ikon design, the senior management personality at Zeiss Ikon in the 1930s, at Carl Zeiss Jena during World War II and later Carl Zeiss Oberkochen. The lead designing personality in the early days of Zeiss Ikon and father of many  groundbreaking Contax rangefinder designs.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2000 in the first line above.

Exclusively Zeiss Ikon

Published in Autumn 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Authors: Joseph K. Brown; John D. Baca

See Page 14 – 18

The story of the Super Ikonta B: a 2 ¼” x 2 ¼” format rangefinder camera that was without equal for most of its life span. No other photographic manufacturer even ventured into the rangefinder market for this size format. It was wildly popular and pocket-able.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

Möller and Zeiss Compact Binoculars

Published in Spring 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Jack Kelly

See Page 4 – 8.

The author chronicles the development of the Möller Tourox prism system for compact binoculars and Zeiss’ actions to take control of the Möller firm to secure the right to the two similar Telita prism systems for use in the 1920 era compact binoculars such as the Turita, Telita and Theatis.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

 

Monoculars in Eisfeld

Published in Autumn 1997  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Marc James Small

See Page 11 – 12

The author discusses the ending of binocular manufacture in Jena since it was in conflict with the established business at Zeiss Oberkochen. The Eisfeld location and the patents/technical drawings were sold to the firm of Docter Optic in Wetzlar. The Turmon product would remain active but under the Docter Optic trademark.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1997 in the first line above.

When Carl Zeiss Jena Meant Eisfeld

Published in Autumn 1997  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Nicholas Grossman

See Pages 9 – 10.

In 1968, VEB Carl Zeiss Jena decided to expand to another location in the town of Eisfeld and moved the manufacture of binoculars to that location which was southwest of Jena. No change was made to the trademarks on the binoculars. The tried and true lens cell trademark still said Carl Zeiss in the top cell and Jena in the bottom.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1997 in the first line above.

A Modern Art of Technology, Jena’s Optical Museum

Published in Autumn 1995 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Dr. Helga Beez

See Page 8 – 11.

The former Zeiss Optical Museum was renamed Jena’s Optical Museum in 1991 when the political situation after the fall of the Berlin Wall and the beginning of German unification brought the situation to a different political time and the former Carl Zeiss Stiftung ceded the ownership of the museum and its contents to a new entity named the Ernst Abbe Stiftung since the former VEB Carl Zeiss Jena was dissolved and the components of that entity was now revised to reflect the multiple new firms that were a part of the new era in Jena. Zeiss Oberkochen would be a major member of their board of directors but Jenoptik and other firms were as well.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1995 in the first line above.