Tag Archives: Autumn 1999

Exclusively Zeiss Ikon

Published in Autumn 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Authors: Joseph K. Brown; John D. Baca

See Page 14 – 18

The story of the Super Ikonta B: a 2 ¼” x 2 ¼” format rangefinder camera that was without equal for most of its life span. No other photographic manufacturer even ventured into the rangefinder market for this size format. It was wildly popular and pocket-able.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

Alexandar Smakula (History)

Published in Autumn 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Page 13.

A biography of this important Zeiss scientist who was a specialist in many scientific areas including optical crystals, organic compounds, lubricants and was the inventor of multi-coating of optics technology in 1934. His invention was held as a state secret until 1941 since it so improved military optics. He was taken to Heidenheim as part of the evacuation of the best of the Zeiss scientistsby the US Army and eventually was taken to the US via Operation Paperclip and finished his career as the dead of  the crystal laboratory at MIT.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

In Search of the Contax IV

Published in Autumn 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author:  Wolf Wehran

See Page 20 – 22

The former head of Zeiss Ikon Public Relations discloses some prototypes developed at Stuttgart to upgrade the Contax IIa and IIIa cameras and most logically was termed the Contax IV inside the firm. At this stage the pre-war prototype and the SLR Syntax camera were not a part of the vocabulary inside the firm or in the collecting community. Pictures of the various prototypes are shown.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

Zeiss Binoculars London Debut

Published in Autumn 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Fred Watson

See Page 4 – 11.

During the era of the British Empire, London was the center of communications for most of the world. The author chronicles how and when Zeiss and other firm’s binoculars were brought to the attention of the buying public – especially military officers. He also provides a table of when other firms debuted their examples of the prism binocular.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.