Tag Archives: Autumn 2006

The C Sonnar F/1.5 50 mm T* ZM

Published in Autumn 2006 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Peter Hennig

See Pages 14 – 16.

The new Cosina rangefinder camera with the Zeiss Ikon trademark opened the door for a new version of the F/1.5 Sonnar 50 mm T* lens which is more appropriate for a rangefinder than the SLR equivalent of the Planar lens. The article discusses this and the near exact symmetry between the new design and the original 1932 design of Ludwig Bertele.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2006 in the first line above.

Zeiss Ikon folders with "starred" serial numbers

Published in Autumn 2006 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Barringer

See Pages 21 – 22.

In the years immediately after World War II, many Zeiss Ikon folding cameras had an additional character attached to the serial number impressed onto the leather covering of the camera. The character was an asterisk. A sample of this sort of serial number is “Q 94031 *” This article breaks out some discussion as to the meaning of this departure from the standard serial number without the asterisk.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2006 in the first line above.

Zeiss Lenses in Leica screw mount

Published in Autumn 2006 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Pages 2 – 6.

While Carl Zeiss Jena did make a few of the Sonnar and Biogon lenses that were the patent based property of Zeiss Ikon in the Leica M39 screw mount, they were very few until the German military made such demands. In 1945, the Americans jumped on the same bandwagon for their Leicas and after July 1, 1945, The Russians ordered them as well for their Fed cameras (which was M39 but at a different screw pitch) and so they ended up on the German market to secure cash for the Russians and to some extent VEB Carl Zeiss Jena.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2006 in the first line above.

Zeiss Jena 10 x 70 H, an unknown member of the H binocular family

Published in Autumn 2006 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Brian Paul Calen; Hans Seeger

See Pages 7 – 13.

This article discusses the discovery of a unique (meaning one of a kind) high luminosity binocular with a 70 mm diameter objective lens. Clearly a prototype that slipped out of the control of Zeiss and into the hands of an American collector. The specifications of this glass are clearly of the highest contemporary quality and design.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2006 in the first line above.