Tag Archives: Microscopes

Zeiss Tele-Microscope

Published in Spring 2007 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author:Jack Kelly

See Pages 11 – 12.

The author discusses a certain microscope base that accommodates included binocular and monocular loupes as a combination device in case. The pairings were first noticed in a Zeiss medical catalog in 1924 and was last seen in another catalog dated 1937.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2007 in the first line above.

The Early Postwar Development of Zeiss Microscopes

Published in Spring 1997  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Gellis

See Pages 3 – 7.

The author author discusses the development of totally new microscope designs at Zeiss Opton and Carl Zeiss Oberkochen while Carl Zeiss Jena recovers the ground of the pre-war designs for which it still had copies of the technical drawings.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1997 in the first line above.

The Mikrotar macro lenses

Published in Autumn 2007 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Barringer

See Pages 6 – 10.

The Mikrotars were special microscopical objectives in the Royal Microscope Society screw mount. The author describes the breadth of the Mikrotar line in the late 1930s and shows specialized accessories for use with the Contax camera.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2007 in the first line above.

Zeiss Stereo Microscopes (non identical twins from Jena and Oberkochen)

Published in Spring 2007 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: John Schilling

See Pages 2 -4.

The author (a former member of the Zeiss US staff specializing in microscopes) compares two microscopes that came out as new models from both Carl Zeiss Oberkochen and VEB Carl Zeiss Jena in the years immediately after the war. The East German variety was known as the Citoplast and the West German as the Zeiss Opton (later Carl Zeiss) Stereo Microscope. In many respects these two instruments were virtually clones which means that the design was begun in Jena during the war and someone carried it to West Germany in their memory bank. These models were replacements of the Greenough or X stand. They were not identical but clearly from the same parentage.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2007 in the first line above.

Early Zeiss Microscopes

Published in Spring 1999  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Page 20- 22.

Based on information coming from Zeiss Oberkochen based on materials found in the Carl Zeiss Jena Archive, we see the first definitive chronicling of the earliest Zeiss microscopes.  The article si accompanied by a table of serial numbers by year and type (Simple versus Compound) with a sampling of the dates of certain microscope model’s introduction.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1999 in the first line above.

A New Concept: The L-Stand (Microscopes)

Published in Spring 1991  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Gellis

See Page 3 – 6.

The author covers the introduction in 1933 the newly designed L Stand which brought an entirely new silhouette to the market with a cornucopia of newly designed accessories and features that would influence the design across the market for many years to come. VEB Carl Zeiss Jena would continue the design after World War II but the folks in Oberkochen would begin with a totally clean design table and would advance these concepts but in a totally new device trademarked the Standard series

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1991 in the first line above.

Zeiss and Bausch & Lomb Chronology (History)

Published in Spring 1987 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Nicholas Grossman

See Page 14.

For many years, the firms and Bausch and Lomb and Carl Zeiss Jena were engaged in cooperative agreements, licensing agreements and there was even  a point where Zeiss had a 20%+ ownership stake in Bausch and Lomb which was terminated by World War I. This article discusses the beginning so Bausch and Lomb and these agreements.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1987 in the first line above.