Tag Archives: Photographic Lenses

Zeiss Lenses in Leica screw mount

Published in Autumn 2006 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Pages 2 – 6.

While Carl Zeiss Jena did make a few of the Sonnar and Biogon lenses that were the patent based property of Zeiss Ikon in the Leica M39 screw mount, they were very few until the German military made such demands. In 1945, the Americans jumped on the same bandwagon for their Leicas and after July 1, 1945, The Russians ordered them as well for their Fed cameras (which was M39 but at a different screw pitch) and so they ended up on the German market to secure cash for the Russians and to some extent VEB Carl Zeiss Jena.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2006 in the first line above.

The Contarex Family of Cameras

Published in Spring 2007 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Pages 5 -10.

The Contarex camera spent nearly 10 years on the design drawing boards at Zeiss Ikon before it came to market in late 1959 and it was the most advanced camera of its day when announced. Plus, it had the most spectacular collection of interchangeable lenses but it was a hard sell. Why??? It was very expensive, quite heavy and the competition was not very far behind. This was still true as later models evolved. Plus it was regarded as so intricate that it was difficult to repair. Not so for the Japanese cameras that came soon after.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2007 in the first line above.

The Challenge of Wide-Angle Lenses in the Early Contax

Published in Spring 2000  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Barringer

See Page 12 – 15.

During the early days of the Contax camera, the most difficult lenses to adhere to the standards of Carl Zeiss Jena were the wide angle lenses. In an attempt to address the market needs, short term solutions such as the Orthometar, Wide angle Tessar and Biotars came to the market before Ludwig Bertele designed the 35 mm Biogon.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2000 in the first line above.

The Coburg Connection

Published in Autumn 2005 Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Barringer

See Pages 20 – 24.

After WWII, there was a great shortage of equipment to begin manufacturing photo lenses in the Western zones of Germany. Luckily, a small medical subsidiary (Kollmorgen) of the Carl Zeiss Stiftung had relocated with appropriate equipment to the small town of Coberg since it had major damage early in the war. So, Zeiss temporarily moved there to begin manufacturing Tessar lenses and filters.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 2005 in the first line above.