Tag Archives: Spring 1991

Zeiss Ikon’s First Postwar Camera Family

Published in Spring 1991  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Larry Gubas

See Page 15 – 16

The first new family of cameras produced by Zeiss Ikon in Stuttgart after World War II was a series of three cameras with the names, Ikonta 35, Contina and Contessa. These were very small symmetrical cameras from the design table of Hubert Nerwin although they would appear after he relocated in 1947 to Rochester, NY. Thereis a discussion of the problem with lens manufacture and so the early versions of the first camera appeared with Novar and Xenar lenses until Zeiss Opton was able to manufacture Tessar lenses. These were exceptional new designs.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1991 in the first line above.

The Topogon – A Footnote (Cameras)

Published in Spring 1991  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Barringer

See Page 7 – 9

The author discusses the use of this design and trademark which was originally purposefully designed for us in the esoteric world of photogrammetry but came to become multiple prototypes for the Contax rangefinder with some actual examples that came to market.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1991 in the first line above.

A New Concept: The L-Stand (Microscopes)

Published in Spring 1991  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Charles Gellis

See Page 3 – 6.

The author covers the introduction in 1933 the newly designed L Stand which brought an entirely new silhouette to the market with a cornucopia of newly designed accessories and features that would influence the design across the market for many years to come. VEB Carl Zeiss Jena would continue the design after World War II but the folks in Oberkochen would begin with a totally clean design table and would advance these concepts but in a totally new device trademarked the Standard series

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1991 in the first line above.

The Bombing of Jena (History)

Published in Spring 1991  Zeiss Historica Journal

Author: Marion Husid

See Page 10 – 14

A discussion of the organization of the United States Bombing Survey and the organization of much of the German manufacturing committees during World War II is presented with an emphasis on how the Zeiss factories were largely untouched until early 1945.

To go to the Journal itself, click on the year 1991 in the first line above.